Chrondroitin outperforms celecoxib in knee osteoarthritis study — ScienceDaily

 

Osteoarthritis is a slowly progressive disease in which joint cartilage breaks down. Normally, cartilage on the ends of bones allows smooth, pain-free joint movements. In OA, cartilage becomes thin and irregular, resulting in symptoms of joint pain and stiffness. Grinding or cracking sensations may occur. Joints that are under high stress due to repeated activity or weight bearing are most susceptible to OA. The hips, knees, hands and spine are commonly affected. OA becomes more common with aging.

 

Chondroitin sulfate, more commonly called chondroitin, has long been the subject of debate when it comes to its usefulness in treating OA. Canadian researchers recently explored how this treatment would affect how OA progresses as well as how it compared to celecoxib (Celebrex®) — an often used first-line symptomatic treatment in the disease.

“We felt the present study was necessary in order to establish — using the most recent imaging technology available, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) — whether chondroitin sulfate can truly and effectively reduce the progression of the disease in patients suffering from knee OA,” says lead investigator in the study, Jean-Pierre Pelletier, MD; professor of medicine, University of Montreal; director, Rheumatic Disease Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal School of Medicine; head, Arthritis Division, University of Montreal Hospital Centre (CHUM); head, Chair in Osteoarthritis of the University of Montreal; and director, Osteoarthritis Research Unit, University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM).

 

Dr. Pelletier’s team studied 194 people with knee OA and inflammation of the synovial membrane in the knee. The participants were followed for two years and were divided into two groups. The first group took 1200mg (pharmacological preparation) of chondroitin daily, and the second group took 200mg of celecoxib daily.

 

For the first time, chondroitin sulfate has been more successful than celecoxib in reducing the long-term progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA), according to new research findings presented this week at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Meeting in San Francisco.

 

Many of us who are over the age of 50, now have a better understanding of the phrase (symptoms of joint pain and stiffness) as mentioned in paragraph one…

If you are using either of these products (chondroitin daily – celecoxib daily)for joint pain , we would love to hear your story … PLEASE COMMENT 

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